Five signs to watch out for that warn you that your smartphone has been hacked

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 Five signs to watch out for that warn you that your smartphone has been hacked

After being infected with malware, your iPhone or Android device is usually under extra stress.

This can result in reduced phone performance and battery life, as well as frequent overheating.

Hackers infect users' phones with malware to steal their data, such as their online credentials or bank account details.

It should be noted that any performance issues can be caused by something other than a virus, such as the age of your device, but if this occurs in a relatively new phone, there is likely something more serious.

And if you're worried about your phone being hacked, here are the telltale signs you can look out for:

1. Slow smartphone performance

If the apps are taking longer than expected to load, it may mean that you have been hacked.

The same applies if the app crashes randomly as well.

2. Battery drains quickly

Smartphone batteries wear out faster over time. But if it happens suddenly, it may indicate the presence of malware.

This is because malware runs secretly in the background, and it sucks more energy to perform its malicious tasks.

3. Data in use

If you notice that your data is being consumed very quickly, this could also be a sign of a hack.

Similar to the battery, malware can send its gadgets to run in the background of the phone.

4.  Pop-ups

Pop-ups are somewhat set in web browsers. But when you start to appear very frequently at different points, it could mean that your device is infected with some kind of dodgy adware.

5. Overheating

A smartphone that overheats may mean that it is getting old or is getting too much sun.

But this could also be an indication that some malware is starting to work.

What to do if you suspect your phone has been hacked

Five signs to watch out for that warn you that your smartphone has been hacked
Five signs to watch out for that warn you that your smartphone has been hacked

If you think that your smartphone might be infected with a virus, malware, or something else deceptive, the first thing to do is download a reliable antivirus app and run a scan.

You should also delete any apps that you think may be behind this hack.

And if the problem persists, your last resort might be to reset your phone — but back up your precious files, like photos, first.


Source: The Sun

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